Bridget

Posts Tagged ‘ferns’

Out and about in Arigna. part 2.

In arigna, Off the beaten track. on August 16, 2012 at 4:18 pm

We sheltered in the old school shed during a rain shower. One could almost hear the laughter and chat that went on here in times gone by. No ipads and mobile phones then,  just skipping rope and hide and seek. I wonder did children have the problems they have now. I suppose not,  but I’m not under the illusion that all was better then. The problems were just different.

Remains of other old buildings add to the air of abandonment.

The roof on this building, just down from the school, looks remarkable good. Some lovely stone in the walls here.

Ferns and mosses seem to love the lime in these old walls.

In the distance the mountains are being taken over by wind turbines and monoculture plantations of Sitka Spruce. Money being made for people who live far away from here. With the threat of fracking on the agenda who knows what will be next on the horizon. Fracking rigs? Let’s hope not!

As we head home we pass through tunnels of conifers…

and some fast moving Fuschia!!

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On the lane…

In nature, Off the beaten track., sustainable living on July 1, 2012 at 12:25 pm

July 1st is here and walking on the lane with the dogs this morning it almost had an Autumn feel. All the rain has kept everything lush and green. But then that’s what people love Ireland for…the forty shades of green.  I’ve never met anyone who came here for the good weather.

The lane is a 3 mile long cul-de-sac. We live about 2 miles along. There are lots of other houses on the lane so it’s not as isolated as it would initially seem.

Berries have already set on the Hawthorn, adding to the Autumnal feel. In his book Food for free, Richard Mabey, says : “When fully ripe they taste a little like avacado pear. They make a moderate jelly, but being a dry fruit need long simmering with a few crab apples to bring out all the juices and provide the necessary pectin. Otherwise the jelly will be sticky or rubbery. It is a good accompaniment to cream cheese.”

I think this arrangement of Ferns, Hawthorn, Moss and Foxgloves looks lovely. Nature does it better than any garden designer. A passing Sheep has made a contribution to the scene. Diarmiud Gavin eat your heart out! No multi-coloured monstrosities needed here!

Maybe the wool was from this Mama who thinks she is invisible as she sits quitely in the long grass.

“Hey Mama, I think they can see you.”

Foxgloves are playing a blinder this year…so many of them. Gorgeous!

Lettie likes to drink from the puddles on the lane. In their water bowls in the house we always add Citricidal, which is good for eliminating internal parasites. Given the choice she always goes for the pure unadulterated rain water.

 

Weird and wonderful plant containers.

In Gardening on July 12, 2011 at 7:52 am

We use all sorts of weird and wonderful objects to make containers for plants. This one is a snare drum with a succelent in.

Two more drums from the same set. I think there’s two more left to be planted from the kit. Don’t worry Andy got a new set so he’s not without drums.

An old pair of wellington boots make a home for more succelents which are starting to spread nicely.

Old worn out boots are given a new task.

Metal dustbin filled with Ferns, Ivy and a Hosta.

Finally, an old cast iron stove planted up with succulents. Yes, I do like succulents. They are easy to care for, grow easily from cuttings and spread fairly quickly.

Rainbows and other musings from Prospect Cottage.

In arigna, Gardening on June 23, 2011 at 10:46 am

Are’nt rainbows beautiful? This was one of several which adorned the valley yesterday evening. One benefit of the changeability of the current weather, rain and sunshine alternating produce these beautiful arches of prismatic colours in the sky.

A vase of Ferns and Snapdragons adorn the window in the fading evening light. The stained glass Trinity Knot has the same colours as the rainbow. The morning sun catches it here in the east facing window and throws it’s own rainbow on the kitchen table.

In the new flower bed this Aquilega has come into flower. Isn’t it pretty? I wonder if seeds from this will breed true. I will save some anyway and see what I get.

In the veg garden the Peas are flowering and the first pods have formed. These are Meteor a low growing variety. They are supported by a circle of sheep wire held in position with a couple of bits of bamboo.

Lots of edible flowers have self-seeded in the polytunnel. Marigold, Borage and Nasturtiums all add colour to our salad bowls,Kale and Carrots are growing in this patch too. This system of companion planting keeps everything healthy and disease free.

At the opposite end of the polytunnel Cosmos and Borage are also attracting lots of beneficial insects.

The Evening Walk. Part 1

In Animals, arigna, Off the beaten track. on May 7, 2011 at 8:08 am

Every day, (sometimes twice in the day), I go, with our two dogs Lettie and Alice, for a walk along The Railroad. The Railroad is the name given to the narrow road on which we live. So called because, up to the 1950s it had a narrow gauge railway bringing coal from the nearby mines. So, down our steep drive. The dogs wait to see if we turn right or left.

Right today. Lettie, the white speck in the pic, has to be in front, leading the way, ever the terrier.

Alice, always behind, he is 14 now, entitled to take his time.

The dogs run about, sniffing and checking out every Badger pass. For me it is the daily changes in the hedgerows that I love. The Hawthorn dripping with Lichens, signifying the clean air, the coming into leaf, then the flowers and last of all the haws, before Winter. So many wild flowers and plants, it’s hard to have a favourite. Herb Robert I always have a soft spot for though.Then there’s the Ferns, unfolding a little each day, to reveal their full beauty. I just love Ferns, some of the oldest plants on the Earth. 

   Check in tomorrow for part 2.